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Electrics and fire protection. ATPL Preparation Certificate 021 - ENAC
Formation ATPL
Electrics and fire protection. ATPL Preparation Certificate 021 - ENAC
Auteurs : Pierre Le Gleuher, Laurence Morin, Philippe Rapp
Collection : ENAC Series
Rubrique : Pilotage & loisirs aéronautiques, Métiers de l'aéro, contrôleurs, PNC...
Publics concernés : ATPL, Pilots, Books in English
Mots clés : planning, aviation
Référence : 1117
I.S.B.N. : 9782364931176
Année de parution : 2014

Quantité  
33.00 € 
DESCRIPTION DU PRODUIT :
Format : 17x24
Reliure : Broché
Nombre de pages : 178
Année de parution : 2014
Référence : 1117
I.S.B.N. : 9782364931176
Langue : Anglais

This book is aimed at future pilots willing to study Electrics and fire protection (021) within the framework of ATPL Theoretical Certificates. It complies with EASA's Learning Objectives for the 021 Certificate. The chapters are all illustrated to facilitate the reader's comprehension. At the end of each chapter, the reader will find key-points  highlighting the most important notions.  

Pierre Le Gleuher is a former student pilot of the ENAC. 

Laurence Morin is engineer and  head of pilot theoretical training at the ENAC. She teaches Airframe, Systems and Electricity to future pilots and  engineers at the ENAC. 

Philippe Rapp is an electronics and electricity engineer. He used to teach Aircraft Electrical Systems to future pilots and Airport Electricity to future electronics engineers at the ENAC.He now works for the Technical Service of French Civil Aviation for energy and airport ground lighting.


TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
PART 1: REMINDERS OF ELECTRICITY BASICS
 
CHAPTER 1: ELECTROSTATICS
 
1 Electric charges
1.1 Basic properties of electric charges
2 Theatom
2.1 Properties of atoms
3 The electrical field
3.1 The Faraday cage
4 Electrical potential
5 Storing charges
6 Details on capacitors
6.1Definition- description
6.2 Capacitance
6.3 Behaviour in a circuit
6.4 Breakdown
6.5 Multiple capacitors
7 AIRCRAFT
7.1 Accumulation of electrostatic charges on the airframe
7.2 Lightning
7.3 Protecting the systems
7.4 The solution: bonding
7.5 Static wicks/static dischargers
 
CHAPTER 2: DIRECT CURRENT
 
1 Circuits
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Electromotive force
1.3 Voltage and current
2 Generators and receivers
2.1 Definitions
2.2 Multiple generators
3 Resistance
3.1Ohm's law
3.2 Expression of resistance
3.3 Variation in resistivity as a function of temperature
3.4 Multiple resistances
4 Power and Energy
4.1 Work done
4.2 Work, energy and power in electricity
 
CHAPTER 3: ELECTROMAGNETISM
 
1 Magnets
1.1 Properties
2 The magnetic field
2.1 Influence of magnetic fields
3 The sources of magnetic fields
3.1 "Permanent" magnets
3.2 Wires with current flowing in them
4 Electromagnetic induction
4.1 Notion of magnetic flux
5 Direct applications
5.1 Transformers
5.2 Switches, contactors and relays
 
CHAPTER 4: ALTERNATING CURRENT
 
1 General
1.1 Definitions
1.2 Periodic signals, alternating signals
1.3 Alternative values
1.4 RMS (Root Mean Square) Value
2 Circuits
2.1 Resistive circuits
2.2 Capacitive circuit
2.3 Inductive circuit
2.4 Conclusion
3 AC power
3.1 True, reactive and apparent power
3.2 Conclusion
4 Three-phase currents
4.1 Origin of three-phase current
4.2 Construction of single and three-phase generators
4.3 Three-phase connections
4.4 Relationships between currents and voltages
4.5 Advantages  and drawbacks  of three-phase current as compared  with single- phase current
5 Conversions
5.1 From AC to DC
5.2 From DC to AC
 
CHAPTER 5: PROTECTING ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS
 
1 Description of electrical faults
1.1 Short circuits
1.2 Overload
1.3 Earth default
2 Different types of protection
2.1 Fuses
2.2 Protecting electronic appliances
 
PART 2 : AIRCRAFT ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS
 
CHAPTER 1: THE MAIN PRINCIPLES
 
1 Electricity onboard
1.1 Electricity: system  energy supplies
1.2 The benefits of electricity
1.3 Drawbacks
1.4 Safety and fail-safe
2 Why AC onboard?
2.1 The benefits of alternating current
2.2 The drawbacks of alternating current
2.3 Table of voltages used onboard aircraft
 
CHAPTER 2: DISTRIBUTION
 
1 Introduction
1.1 Symbolism
1.2 Single pole (or unipole) system
1.3 Comments on standard diagrams
2 Aircraft with DC primary generation
2.1 Standard diagram for a light single-engine aircraft
2.2 Standard diagram for a twin with 28V DC generation
3 Aircraft with AC primary generation
3.1 Electrical networks with independent alternators
3.2 Electrical networks with coupled alternators
3.3 Commands and controls
4 Paralleling and load sharing
4.1 Basic rules
4.2 Coupling of two DC generators
4.3 Paralleling of two alternators (single-phase and three-phase)
 
CHAPTER 3: ELECTRICAL FAULTS
 
1 Protecting DC generation circuits
1.1 Reminders and extra details for DC generator breakers
1.2 DC generator overheating
1.3 DC generator overload
1.4 Feeder fault
1.5 DC generator overvoltage
2 Protecting AC generation circuits
2.1 Reminders and extra details for alternators
2.2 Independent alternators
2.3 Alternators operating in parallel3 Engine fire
 
 
PART 3: GENERATORS
 
CHAPTER 1: ROTATING MACHINES
 
1 DC generators (dynamos)
1.1 Principles behind a DC generator
1.2 Supply of the DC generator field system
2 Alternators
2.1 Basic principles for alternators
2.2 Obtaining the magnetic flux
2.3 Alternators used on aircraft
2.4 CSD (Constant Speed Drive)
 
CHAPTER 2: BATTERIES AND COUPLING IN DC CIRCUITS
 
1 Batteries
1.1 Cell
1.2 Lead acid cell
1.3 Alkaline cell (Nickel/cadmium)
1.4 Comparison of voltages between lead acid and Ni/Cd cells
1.5 Capacity of a cell
1.6 Capacities of several cells
1.7 Comparison of lead acid and Ni-Cad batteries
1.8 End-of-charge risks
2 Aircraft batteries
2.1 Location and storage
2.2 Controls
2.3 Recharging batteries
2.4 Coupling
 
CHAPTER 3: OTHER SOURCES OF CURRENT
 
1 APU alternator
1.1 How the APU works
1.2 Location in the aircraft
1.3 Diagram of the electrical network, with use of the APU
2 Ground Power Unit (GPU)
2.1 Ground connection
2.2 Priorities
3 The ADG (Air Driven Generator)
 
PART 4: ELECTRIC MOTORS
 
CHAPTER 1: ELECTRIC MOTORS
 
1 Dc motors
1.1 Motor with separate excitation
1.2 Shunt wound motors
1.3 Series wound motors
1.4 Compound wound motors
1.5 A special case: starter generators
1.6 Drawbacks of DC motors
2 Ac motors
2.1 Production of the rotating magnetic field by the stator
2.2 Synchronous motors
2.3 Asynchronous motors (= induction motor)
 
PART 5 : SEMI-CONDUCTORS
 
CHAPTER 1: SEMI-CONDUCTORS  AND LOGIC CIRCUITS
 
1 Definitions
1.1 The atom.
1.2 Isolators, conductors, semi-conductors
1.3 Conduction in a semi-conductor
1.4 N and P doping
1.5 P-N junction
2 Examples of applications
2.1 Diodes
2.2 Transistors: Switching and amplification
3 Logic Circuits
3.1 The AND gate
3.2 The OR gate
3.3 The NOT gate
3.4 The NOR gate
3.5 The NAND gate
 
PART 6 : FIRE AND SMOKE PROTECTION
 
CHAPTER 1: FIRE AND SMOKE PROTECTION
 
1 Risks
1.1 The 3 conditions for fire to start
1.2 Risks
1.3 Aircraft zones
1.4 Overview
2 Detection
2.1 General principles
2.2 Smoke detectors
2.3 Fire detectors (= overheat detector)
3 Extinguishing fires
3.1 Fire classification
3.2 Fire Extinguishants
3.3 Engine protection
3.4 APU protection
3.5 Cargo compartment protection
3.6 EU-OPS requirements regarding hand extinguishers


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